Wizard of oz symbolic to the

Monetary policy[ edit ] In a article, [5] educator and historian Henry Littlefield outlined an allegory in the book of the late 19th-century debate regarding monetary policy. According to this view, for instance, the Yellow Brick Road represents the gold standardand the silver slippers ruby in the film version represent the Silverite sixteen to one silver ratio dancing down the road. The City of Oz earns its name from the abbreviation of ounces "Oz" in which gold and silver are measured.

Wizard of oz symbolic to the

The Wizard of Oz over the years has become one of the truly classic movies among children and adults alike. It tells the story of a young girl who ends up in a tornado and gets carried Wizard of oz symbolic to the her Kansas farm home to a land that is not like anything she has seen ever before.

The nice witch Glinda then explains to Dorothy that to find out about getting back home she needs to follow the yellow brick road and ask the Wizard of Oz.

Along her way down the yellow brick road Dorothy meets some new friends who all have something they want to ask the great wizard. However, when they finally get to the Emerald City and meet the wizard, they discover he is just a fraud and that everything they had been searching for they can find within themselves.

Wizard of oz symbolic to the

Speculation began in the s with a history teacher of parallels between the novel and U. Henry Littlefield used the movie in his lecture and had students of his help to find the parallels between real life and the movie. The parallels were published in in American Quarterly and sparked years worth of debate.

Whether any of these speculations are true or not, none of us know for sure. However here are some of the symbols that have been suggested for The Wizard of Oz.

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She proves to be loyal, resourceful and determined. Another speculation was that she represents the U. Some people put more faith in this theory more than the other one due to similarnames The-o-dore and Dor-o-thy.

It is thought that Toto also represents average Americans. Henry Cantwell Wallace was a well known farmer and editor for a leading farm magazine in the late s. He was called Uncle Henry by most everyone.

During the time that the story was written, American farmers were suffering from the effects of federal deflation. Their debts were growing larger as they were getting less money for their crops and other goods.

The farmers wanted the dollar value to have fixed ratios of both gold and silver. The little people, the munchkins, are said to represent the common people or ordinary U.

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The Lollipop Guild is seen as representing child labor. Another speculation is that the silver slippers are a representation of the power to vote. The Tin Man was immobile and rusted, which is something many factory workers felt when many businesses began to shut down due to a national depression.

They felt helpless after they lost their jobs. He complained about not having a brain but wound up as the most adept problem solver among the four travelers. In the late s William Jennings Bryan, a politician, was a supporter of the free silver movement.

It is said that the Cowardly Lion represents Bryan, who was viewed as someone having a load roar, but no power or bite. Wicked Witch of the West and East: The Wicked Witch of the East represents eastern business and the Wicked Witch of the West represents the politician William McKinley who defeated Williams Jennings Bryant during the time of the free silver silver movement.

Good Witch of the South and North. This provides a contrast between wicked industrialists from the west with the railroad moguls in the west. Another speculation is they represent Native Americans. Dorothy and friends are told when they meet up with the monkeys that they were once a free people who happily lived in the forest where they flew from tree to tree eating fruit and nuts and doing whatever they pleased without having to call anyone master.

This was years before Oz appeared from the clouds to rule over the land. This appears to relate well with the fate of Native Americans who had been forced from their land by Americans migrating from the east.WIZARD OF OZ and the ILLUMINATI MIND CONTROL.

Wizard of oz symbolic to the

CHAPTER 5 SCIENCE NO.5 - THE SKILL OF LYING, THE ART OF DECEIT The rule of thumb that the programmers/handlers go by is that they will say anything to get the job done. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz It was originally published by the George M.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz | The Vigilant Citizen The Wonderful Wizard of Oz:
What is the symbolic meaning of 'The Wizard of Oz' Monetary policy[ edit ] In a article, [5] educator and historian Henry Littlefield outlined an allegory in the book of the late 19th-century debate regarding monetary policy.

Hill Company in Chicago on May 17, , and has since been reprinted countless times, most often under the name The Wizard of Oz, which is the name of both the stage play and the . Our Hop-on Hop-Off tour offers ultimate flexibility and an insider’s look into this historic and bustling city.

This is THE way to see Washington DC. DC Trails offers three different double-decker bus tours, highlighting the must-see landmarks and memorials of the US Capitol. Abandonment - See Fear Of Abandonment.. Abuse Amnesia - Abuse Amnesia is a form of cognitive suppression where an abuse victim has trouble remembering episodes where their boundaries have been violated..

Abusive Cycle - This is the name for the ongoing rotation between destructive and constructive behavior which is typical of many dysfunctional relationships and families. Symbolism of the ‘Wizard of Oz’ Practically everyone has either seen or heard The Wizard of Oz and Dorothy story.

The Wizard of Oz over the years has become one of the truly classic movies among children and adults alike.

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz The Bad Wizard of Oz is a children's novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. It was originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago on May 17, , and has since been reprinted countless times, most often under the name The Wizard of Oz, which is the name of both the .

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